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Broken Promise-Book Review

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The next installment in the Sons of Broad series by Tara Thomas is an instant read. I got some answers to questions from previous books, I got to know a character I had almost forgotten about, I got my slow burn even with instant attraction, and I got my hopes up for an upcoming book to tell Jade’s story.

Kipling Benedict is on the sidelines, metaphorically, watching his brothers find their happily-ever-afters and while he’s not anxious to put a ring on anything, he’s seeing the big picture in front of him. But before he can find his perfect match, he has a pesky problem.

The half-sister he didn’t know he had has now been kidnapped and held for ransom. The Benedict brothers just recently found out about their sister but have not had time to get all the details of where she’s been their entire life. No matter about that, a Benedict has been kidnapped and all hands are on deck to find her.

Kipling needs help and he finds it in Alyssa. We met Alyssa in previous books and her story is sad. She knows way too much about loss and having to watch loved ones disappear. Now she’s going to help Kipling find his sister, having no idea her paths in life are about to get into a giant pretzel with Kipling’s cobblestone walkways. This may seem like a big confusing circus, but Tara Thomas has a way of storytelling and weaving so the reader is not lost on the details.

We know there is some shady character called The Gentlemen and we get his identity and history in this book. We finally get closure on Alyssa’s sister. We find out her parents are truly heinous people and I suspect we have not heard the last of the stepdad.

Jade is such a vivid character and I hope she gets a full-length novel. Nobody puts Jade in a novella that can be soaked up while at some dentists’ waiting room. Give me an hours-long bath and front porch to really take in Jade’s story. Make it happen, Tara!

Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC for my honest review. This book is set for publication on June 26th.

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